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Published On: Fri, Jun 23rd, 2017

Somaliland:Archaeologists discover a lost Ethiopian city

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There is a local myth that the Harlaa region was once occupied by giants, because the buildings and walls of the settlements there were constructed with enormous stone blocks that surely could not be lifted by ordinary people. Professor Insoll was quick to dispel this legend, though the local people do not yet believe him, he added.
Scientists believe that Ethiopia was one of the first places inhabited by humans. In 2015, archaeologists discovered jaw bones and teeth in the north-west of the country which they date as being between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years old.
Among the pots and pans the team also discovered jewellery and other eye-popping artefacts from as far afield as the Maldives, Madagascar and China. Harlaa, Professor Insoll told the BBC, was a “rich, cosmopolitan” hub for jewellery making. “Residents of Harlaa were a mixed community of foreigners and local people who traded with others in the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and possibly as far away as the Arabian Gulf.”
There is a local myth that the Harlaa region was once occupied by giants, because the buildings and walls of the settlements there were constructed with enormous stone blocks that surely could not be lifted by ordinary people. Professor Insoll was quick to dispel this legend, though the local people do not yet believe him, he added.
Scientists believe that Ethiopia was one of the first places inhabited by humans. In 2015, archaeologists discovered jaw bones and teeth in the north-west of the country which they date as being between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years old.

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